208.33%
  • raised £12,500.00
  • Goal £6,000.00
  • Day left ENDED

Campaign description

Introduction

Bangladeshi Children’s Fund (BCF) was set up as part of Deen Relief strategy of making a difference directly. Following our success with our first fund, we now are looking to raise money for BCF 2 with the aim of raising £15000.

NOTICE REGARDING FUNDS RAISED

Please note that if we fail to raise the amount of money we have set ourselves (our Goal), we will simply use whatever amount that has been raised and distribute it for our cause. If we raise more than our target, then we will use the surplus to purchase extra food and distribute it.

Location

Bangladesh is divided into 7 regions. Sylhet is based in the north east of Bangladesh with the population of around 3.4 million. This region suffers from heavy rains and flooding, during the rainy season many villages lose access to food and medical care. There is also extreme poverty and lack of medical care, the biggest sufferers are children in this region, which is why we wanted to get involved directly.

Bangladesh is divided into 7 regions. Sylhet is based in the north east of Bangladesh with the population of around 3.4 million. This region suffers from heavy rains and flooding, during the rainy season many villages lose access to food and medical care. There is also extreme poverty and lack of medical care, the biggest sufferers are children in this region, which is why we wanted to get involved directly.

Sylhet division kids suffer the most

Sylhet division has the highest rate of children suffering from malnutrition and stunted growth, followed by Chittagong, though their poverty rates are among the lowest in the country.
At least 44.6 percent children below the age of five in Sylhet have stunted growth, while 38.5 percent are underweight, according to a new study titled “Undernutrition Maps of Bangladesh 2012”.

Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS) and World Food Programme (WFP) unveiled the study report at Bangabandhu International Convention Centre in the capital. They prepared the report with support from the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and technical assistance from Massey University of New Zealand. The findings are interesting, as according to Bangladesh Poverty Maps 2010 Rangpur and Barisal divisions have the highest poverty rates while Chittagong and Sylhet divisions have the lowest.

The report says dietary intake, maternal and childcare practices, water, sanitation and health services are the key factors behind child nutrition. First 1,000 days of a child are critical as the way they are fed at the time has a major impact on their health. Sylhet and Chittagong might not have fared well than Barisal and Khulna regarding feeding infants, she said.

The latest malnutrition study that covered upazilas for the first time says 300 out of 544 upazilas of the country have seen 40 percent of their children suffer from stunted growth while more than 30 percent children in another 440 upazilas are underweight. The critical threshold level regarding stunted growth set by the World Health Organisation is 40 percent and for underweight, 30 percent.

District-wise, Bandarban of Chittagong division has the highest 47.7 percent stunted children, followed by Sunamganj of Sylhet at 46.1 percent.

A 2012 study says malnutrition costs Bangladesh more than Tk 7,000 crore annually in terms of lost productivity, and even more in health care costs. According to the population census, some 15 million children are under five. It is a matter of concern if 40 percent of them face malnutrition, experts say.

Another study on impacts of climate-related shocks on food security and nutrition in rural Bangladesh says food prices go higher in the affected areas, having negative impacts on nutritional status. The report above shows why there is a huge need for food in Sylhet and that is why we must help and set up the BCF fund.

Download the full report from the World Food Program website.

People Involved

Shabek Ali and Rashid Ali the founder and the director of Deen Relief went to lead and manage the distribution of the funds and the goods to those in need. There were also other volunteers and helpers that assisted them in their journey in Bangladesh. We want to thank all the people that were involved and helped make this mission a success.

 

Strategy

We decided that over a 3 week period we deliver the goods to those in need. We have been working for months on the areas that we wanted to target and deliver foods to. We decided that for our first journey we were to go to the following areas:

  • Jogonathpur
  • Bishonath
  • Satuk
  • Sunamjonj
  • Derai
  • Sylhet Area

Our Deenrelief volunteers took out names of many disabled and poor vulnerable children in these locations, took their data and we were going to help them first. We obtained all regulatory permissions from the local Chairman so we would have the legal right to help.

We took all documentation and receipts where possible as evidence of our activity so that our donors are satisfied with our charity. We took countless videos and photos to show the remote areas we went to, many of which have never had any help from any charity at all.

Product

Our product was made of the following which we gave to each disabled children and their family and this included:

  • 50kg of Rice
  • 5kg of Cheek Peas
  • 5kg of Lentils
  • 5 litres of cooking oil

We believe this was a very generous amount of food which could sustain a family over a month. The general cost of each pack came to around £20.

Costing

Volunteers and the Trustees nor Director took any money from the money raised as payment for their services. No money from the fund was used to buy plane tickets or accommodation. Only a small amount from the fund was used to pay for transportation of the goods and the handling of the goods as part of the cost of buying the goods

Delivery

Because of the rainy season and remoteness, we had to hire boats to reach certain areas. There were many flooded areas.

Risk

As always with any new ventures in an overseas territory, there are going to be mistakes made and risks faced by members of the charity. One of the challenges we had were that many normal adults and elderly wanted food packs and we had to turn some away as we wanted to help Children. In some areas, the people were not in need but wanted food packs as they thought it was free, in some instances people came to us twice to get more.
We were also at risk by aggressive crowds wanting to hijack our products.

Conclusion

Overall this has been a successful operation and now we shall build on the BCF brand so that we can raise money every year for this cause.